The nccrc at a glance 

 

The National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel (NCCRC), organized and funded in part by the Public Justice Centeris an association of individuals and organizations committed to ensuring meaningful access to the courts for all.  Founded in 2003, our mission is to encourage, support, and coordinate advocacy to expand recognition and implementation of a right to counsel for low-income people in civil cases that involve basic human needs such as shelter, safety, sustenance, health, and child custody. 

  

At present, the NCCRC has nearly 300 participants in 38 states (see our interactive map's "NCCRC Presence" view to see where they are), all of whom are committed to exploring how the right to counsel in civil cases can best be advanced in their particular jurisdiction.

 

To learn more about the NCCRC, check out the 2-page flyer about NCCRC and a spread about NCCRC in the Public Justice Center's 2016 Annual Report.  Also, the NCCRC turned 10 in 2013, and there was a Clearinghouse Review piece about our history.

 

Staff 

 

John Pollock photo 2

John Pollock is the Coordinator of the National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel and is an attorney at the Public Justice Center. Previously, Mr. Pollock was employed as the Enforcement Director at the Central Alabama Fair Housing Center, and before that was a fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center. He graduated from Northeastern Law School in 2005 and from Wesleyan University with an honors degree in English in 1994. His volunteer and internship work in social justice issues is extensive, including the Northeastern University Poverty Law Clinic, the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, the Land Loss Prevention Project, the Conservation Law Foundation, Shelter Legal Services Foundation, the National Lawyers Guild Detention Working Group, the Waltham Alliance to Create Housing, and Women's Supported Housing and Empowerment. In his spare time, he is the founder and coordinator of the Heirs' Property Retention Coalition, which is devoted to protecting the ancestral property of low-income landowners.